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General Information

Plant Care Instructions By Julie Bawden-Davis

Evergreen shrub/tree that produces lemons. Time of fruiting and type of fruit varies by species.

Is Indoor Plant?

No

These month by month plant care tasks are for plants in the following zones :
Sunset Zones : 22, 23, 24
USDA Zones :
Web Link - For more information

Plant Care Instruction

  • Scroll down or click on any month for plant care instructions
    • January
    • February
    • March
    • April
    • May
    • June
    • July
    • August
    • September
    • October
    • November
    • December
    January
    1. Buy

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.
    2. Protect

    Protect the tree when temperatures are scheduled to dip below freezing. Pull containerized plants next to the house or under a patio cover.
    3. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.
    4. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.
    February
    1. Buy

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.
    2. Protect

    Protect the tree when temperatures are scheduled to dip below freezing. Pull containerized plants next to the house or under a patio cover.
    3. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases,including fungal root infections.
    4. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.
    March
    1. Buy

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.
    2. Fertilize

    Fertilize once a month with a fertilizer designed for citrus trees.
    3. Water

    Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water established trees twice monthly and newly planted trees twice a week. Water containerized trees twice a week.
    4. Mulch

    Maintain a 2-3 inch layer of shredded bark out beyond the dripline.
    5. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.
    6. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.
    7. Special requirements

    Citrus is prone to iron, manganese and zinc deficiencies. Iron deficiency (chlorosis) shows up as yellow leaves with green veins; manganese as mottling on young leaves and pale areas on green leaves and zinc as yellow mottling and blotching between leaf veins. Treat with chelated fertilizers for each condition. If you are unsure which deficiency exists, there are foliar fertilizers that contain chelates of all three nutrients.
    April
    1. Buy

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.
    2. Fertilize

    Fertilize once a month with a fertilizer designed for citrus trees.
    3. Water

    Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water established trees twice monthly and newly planted trees twice a week. Water containerized trees twice a week.
    4. Prune

    Prune out crossing branches or twiggy growth and to keep the plant from becoming rangy. Remove fruit from newly planted trees so they can put energy into growth.
    5. Mulch

    Maintain a 2-3 inch layer of shredded bark out beyond the dripline.
    6. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.
    7. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.
    8. Special requirements

    Citrus is prone to iron, manganese and zinc deficiencies. Iron deficiency (chlorosis) shows up as yellow leaves with green veins; manganese as mottling on young leaves and pale areas on green leaves and zinc as yellow mottling and blotching between leaf veins. Treat with chelated fertilizers for each condition. If you are unsure which deficiency exists, there are foliar fertilizers that contain chelates of all three nutrients.
    May
    1. Buy

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.
    2. Plant

    Plant when the weather is warm in a full-sun location with excellent drainage.
    3. Fertilize

    Fertilize once a month with a fertilizer designed for citrus trees.
    4. Water

    Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water established trees twice monthly and newly planted trees twice a week. Water containerized trees twice a week or more often during especially hot weather. Avoid droughting the tree, which results in split fruit.
    5. Prune

    Prune out crossing branches or twiggy growth and to keep the plant from becoming rangy. Remove fruit from newly planted trees so they can put energy into growth.
    6. Mulch

    Maintain a 2-3 inch layer of shredded bark out beyond the dripline.
    7. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.
    8. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.
    9. Transplant

    Transplant when the weather is warm in a full-sun location with excellent drainage.
    10. Special requirements

    Citrus is prone to iron, manganese and zinc deficiencies. Iron deficiency (chlorosis) shows up as yellow leaves with green veins; manganese as mottling on young leaves and pale areas on green leaves and zinc as yellow mottling and blotching between leaf veins. Treat with chelated fertilizers for each condition. If you are unsure which deficiency exists, there are foliar fertilizers that contain chelates of all three nutrients.
    June
    1. Buy

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.
    2. Plant

    Plant when the weather is warm in a full-sun location with excellent drainage.
    3. Fertilize

    Fertilize once a month with a fertilizer designed for citrus trees.
    4. Water

    Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water established trees twice monthly and newly planted trees twice a week. Water containerized trees twice a week or more often during especially hot weather. Avoid droughting the tree, which results in split fruit.
    5. Prune

    Prune out crossing branches or twiggy growth and to keep the plant from becoming rangy. Remove fruit from newly planted trees so they can put energy into growth.
    6. Mulch

    Maintain a 2-3 inch layer of shredded bark out beyond the dripline.
    7. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.
    8. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.
    9. Transplant

    Transplant when the weather is warm in a full-sun location with excellent drainage.
    10. Special requirements

    Citrus is prone to iron, manganese and zinc deficiencies. Iron deficiency (chlorosis) shows up as yellow leaves with green veins; manganese as mottling on young leaves and pale areas on green leaves and zinc as yellow mottling and blotching between leaf veins. Treat with chelated fertilizers for each condition. If you are unsure which deficiency exists, there are foliar fertilizers that contain chelates of all three nutrients.
    July
    1. Buy

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.
    2. Plant

    Plant when the weather is warm in a full-sun location with excellent drainage.
    3. Fertilize

    Fertilize once a month with a fertilizer designed for citrus trees.
    4. Water

    Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water established trees twice monthly and newly planted trees twice a week. Water containerized trees twice a week or more often during especially hot weather. Avoid droughting the tree, which results in split fruit.
    5. Prune

    Prune out crossing branches or twiggy growth and to keep the plant from becoming rangy. Remove fruit from newly planted trees so they can put energy into growth.
    6. Mulch

    Maintain a 2-3 inch layer of shredded bark out beyond the dripline.
    7. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.
    8. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.
    9. Transplant

    Transplant when the weather is warm in a full-sun location with excellent drainage.
    10. Special requirements

    Citrus is prone to iron, manganese and zinc deficiencies. Iron deficiency (chlorosis) shows up as yellow leaves with green veins; manganese as mottling on young leaves and pale areas on green leaves and zinc as yellow mottling and blotching between leaf veins. Treat with chelated fertilizers for each condition. If you are unsure which deficiency exists, there are foliar fertilizers that contain chelates of all three nutrients.
    August
    1. Buy

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.
    2. Plant

    Plant when the weather is warm in a full-sun location with excellent drainage.
    3. Fertilize

    Fertilize once a month with a fertilizer designed for citrus trees.
    4. Water

    Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water established trees twice monthly and newly planted trees twice a week. Water containerized trees twice a week or more often during especially hot weather. Avoid droughting the tree, which results in split fruit.
    5. Prune

    Prune out crossing branches or twiggy growth and to keep the plant from becoming rangy. Remove fruit from newly planted trees so they can put energy into growth.
    6. Mulch

    Maintain a 2-3 inch layer of shredded bark out beyond the dripline.
    7. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.
    8. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.
    9. Transplant

    Transplant when the weather is warm in a full-sun location with excellent drainage.
    10. Special requirements

    Citrus is prone to iron, manganese and zinc deficiencies. Iron deficiency (chlorosis) shows up as yellow leaves with green veins; manganese as mottling on young leaves and pale areas on green leaves and zinc as yellow mottling and blotching between leaf veins. Treat with chelated fertilizers for each condition. If you are unsure which deficiency exists, there are foliar fertilizers that contain chelates of all three nutrients.
    September
    1. Buy

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.
    2. Fertilize

    Fertilize once a month with a fertilizer designed for citrus trees.
    3. Water

    Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water established trees twice monthly and newly planted trees twice a week. Water containerized trees twice a week or more often during especially hot weather. Avoid droughting the tree, which results in split fruit.
    4. Mulch

    Maintain a 2-3 inch layer of shredded bark out beyond the dripline.
    5. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.
    6. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.
    7. Special requirements

    Citrus is prone to iron, manganese and zinc deficiencies. Iron deficiency (chlorosis) shows up as yellow leaves with green veins; manganese as mottling on young leaves and pale areas on green leaves and zinc as yellow mottling and blotching between leaf veins. Treat with chelated fertilizers for each condition. If you are unsure which deficiency exists, there are foliar fertilizers that contain chelates of all three nutrients.
    October
    1. Buy

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.
    2. Fertilize

    Fertilize once a month with a fertilizer designed for citrus trees.
    3. Water

    Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water established trees twice monthly and newly planted trees twice a week. Water containerized trees twice a week. Avoid droughting the tree, which results in split fruit.
    4. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.
    5. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.
    November
    1. Buy

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.
    2. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.
    3. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.
    December
    1. Buy

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.
    2. Protect

    Protect the tree when temperatures are scheduled to dip below freezing. Pull containerized plants next to the house or under a patio cover.
    3. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.
    4. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.
  • Buy

    When's the best time to buy this plant? When can you buy these from seed (if you can)? When is it usually available? What are things to look for when you're buying it? Or anything other tidbit of information you can share!

    January

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.

    February

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.

    March

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.

    April

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.

    May

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.

    June

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.

    July

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.

    August

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.

    September

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.

    October

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.

    November

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.

    December

    Purchase a healthy tree from a reputable nursery.

    Plant

    When's a good time to plant this plant or bulb? Any special planting instructions?

    May

    Plant when the weather is warm in a full-sun location with excellent drainage.

    June

    Plant when the weather is warm in a full-sun location with excellent drainage.

    July

    Plant when the weather is warm in a full-sun location with excellent drainage.

    August

    Plant when the weather is warm in a full-sun location with excellent drainage.

    Fertilize

    When should you fertilize this plant? Which kind of fertilizer do you recommend? Should you use different fertilizers at different times of year?

    March

    Fertilize once a month with a fertilizer designed for citrus trees.

    April

    Fertilize once a month with a fertilizer designed for citrus trees.

    May

    Fertilize once a month with a fertilizer designed for citrus trees.

    June

    Fertilize once a month with a fertilizer designed for citrus trees.

    July

    Fertilize once a month with a fertilizer designed for citrus trees.

    August

    Fertilize once a month with a fertilizer designed for citrus trees.

    September

    Fertilize once a month with a fertilizer designed for citrus trees.

    October

    Fertilize once a month with a fertilizer designed for citrus trees.

    Water

    Is there a time to reduce or increase watering? Any special requirements? Things to avoid during certain times of the year?

    March

    Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water established trees twice monthly and newly planted trees twice a week. Water containerized trees twice a week.

    April

    Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water established trees twice monthly and newly planted trees twice a week. Water containerized trees twice a week.

    May

    Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water established trees twice monthly and newly planted trees twice a week. Water containerized trees twice a week or more often during especially hot weather. Avoid droughting the tree, which results in split fruit.

    June

    Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water established trees twice monthly and newly planted trees twice a week. Water containerized trees twice a week or more often during especially hot weather. Avoid droughting the tree, which results in split fruit.

    July

    Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water established trees twice monthly and newly planted trees twice a week. Water containerized trees twice a week or more often during especially hot weather. Avoid droughting the tree, which results in split fruit.

    August

    Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water established trees twice monthly and newly planted trees twice a week. Water containerized trees twice a week or more often during especially hot weather. Avoid droughting the tree, which results in split fruit.

    September

    Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water established trees twice monthly and newly planted trees twice a week. Water containerized trees twice a week or more often during especially hot weather. Avoid droughting the tree, which results in split fruit.

    October

    Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water established trees twice monthly and newly planted trees twice a week. Water containerized trees twice a week. Avoid droughting the tree, which results in split fruit.

    Prune

    When's a good time to prune this plant? How about deadheading, pinching back, trimming or any other grooming? Any special requirements?

    April

    Prune out crossing branches or twiggy growth and to keep the plant from becoming rangy. Remove fruit from newly planted trees so they can put energy into growth.

    May

    Prune out crossing branches or twiggy growth and to keep the plant from becoming rangy. Remove fruit from newly planted trees so they can put energy into growth.

    June

    Prune out crossing branches or twiggy growth and to keep the plant from becoming rangy. Remove fruit from newly planted trees so they can put energy into growth.

    July

    Prune out crossing branches or twiggy growth and to keep the plant from becoming rangy. Remove fruit from newly planted trees so they can put energy into growth.

    August

    Prune out crossing branches or twiggy growth and to keep the plant from becoming rangy. Remove fruit from newly planted trees so they can put energy into growth.

    Mulch

    Does this plant need to be mulched? Are there specific types of Mulch which are better for this plant? How much?

    March

    Maintain a 2-3 inch layer of shredded bark out beyond the dripline.

    April

    Maintain a 2-3 inch layer of shredded bark out beyond the dripline.

    May

    Maintain a 2-3 inch layer of shredded bark out beyond the dripline.

    June

    Maintain a 2-3 inch layer of shredded bark out beyond the dripline.

    July

    Maintain a 2-3 inch layer of shredded bark out beyond the dripline.

    August

    Maintain a 2-3 inch layer of shredded bark out beyond the dripline.

    September

    Maintain a 2-3 inch layer of shredded bark out beyond the dripline.

    Protect

    When and how should you protect this plant from birds, deer, rabbits? Does this plant need be covered, or wrapped or painted or moved?

    January

    Protect the tree when temperatures are scheduled to dip below freezing. Pull containerized plants next to the house or under a patio cover.

    February

    Protect the tree when temperatures are scheduled to dip below freezing. Pull containerized plants next to the house or under a patio cover.

    December

    Protect the tree when temperatures are scheduled to dip below freezing. Pull containerized plants next to the house or under a patio cover.

    Pest/Disease Inspection

    What are the common problems this plant will face and when should you look for them to appear?

    January

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.

    February

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases,including fungal root infections.

    March

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.

    April

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.

    May

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.

    June

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.

    July

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.

    August

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.

    September

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.

    October

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.

    November

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.

    December

    Check for pests such as aphids, mealybugs, mites and scale insects and diseases, including fungal root infections.

    Treat for Pest/Disease

    How do you treat the common problems for this plant? What products or concoctions or natural means do you use? Any special requirements?

    January

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.

    February

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.

    March

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.

    April

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.

    May

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.

    June

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.

    July

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.

    August

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.

    September

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.

    October

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.

    November

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.

    December

    Treat for pests with the appropriate organic control, starting with a strong spray of water. Avoid fungal root infections by not overwatering.

    Transplant

    When's the best time to dig up and transplant this from one spot to another? (This is different than planting). Any special requirements?

    May

    Transplant when the weather is warm in a full-sun location with excellent drainage.

    June

    Transplant when the weather is warm in a full-sun location with excellent drainage.

    July

    Transplant when the weather is warm in a full-sun location with excellent drainage.

    August

    Transplant when the weather is warm in a full-sun location with excellent drainage.

    Special requirements

    Any other requirement for this plant? Is there anything that doesn't fit into the other care categories?

    March

    Citrus is prone to iron, manganese and zinc deficiencies. Iron deficiency (chlorosis) shows up as yellow leaves with green veins; manganese as mottling on young leaves and pale areas on green leaves and zinc as yellow mottling and blotching between leaf veins. Treat with chelated fertilizers for each condition. If you are unsure which deficiency exists, there are foliar fertilizers that contain chelates of all three nutrients.

    April

    Citrus is prone to iron, manganese and zinc deficiencies. Iron deficiency (chlorosis) shows up as yellow leaves with green veins; manganese as mottling on young leaves and pale areas on green leaves and zinc as yellow mottling and blotching between leaf veins. Treat with chelated fertilizers for each condition. If you are unsure which deficiency exists, there are foliar fertilizers that contain chelates of all three nutrients.

    May

    Citrus is prone to iron, manganese and zinc deficiencies. Iron deficiency (chlorosis) shows up as yellow leaves with green veins; manganese as mottling on young leaves and pale areas on green leaves and zinc as yellow mottling and blotching between leaf veins. Treat with chelated fertilizers for each condition. If you are unsure which deficiency exists, there are foliar fertilizers that contain chelates of all three nutrients.

    June

    Citrus is prone to iron, manganese and zinc deficiencies. Iron deficiency (chlorosis) shows up as yellow leaves with green veins; manganese as mottling on young leaves and pale areas on green leaves and zinc as yellow mottling and blotching between leaf veins. Treat with chelated fertilizers for each condition. If you are unsure which deficiency exists, there are foliar fertilizers that contain chelates of all three nutrients.

    July

    Citrus is prone to iron, manganese and zinc deficiencies. Iron deficiency (chlorosis) shows up as yellow leaves with green veins; manganese as mottling on young leaves and pale areas on green leaves and zinc as yellow mottling and blotching between leaf veins. Treat with chelated fertilizers for each condition. If you are unsure which deficiency exists, there are foliar fertilizers that contain chelates of all three nutrients.

    August

    Citrus is prone to iron, manganese and zinc deficiencies. Iron deficiency (chlorosis) shows up as yellow leaves with green veins; manganese as mottling on young leaves and pale areas on green leaves and zinc as yellow mottling and blotching between leaf veins. Treat with chelated fertilizers for each condition. If you are unsure which deficiency exists, there are foliar fertilizers that contain chelates of all three nutrients.

    September

    Citrus is prone to iron, manganese and zinc deficiencies. Iron deficiency (chlorosis) shows up as yellow leaves with green veins; manganese as mottling on young leaves and pale areas on green leaves and zinc as yellow mottling and blotching between leaf veins. Treat with chelated fertilizers for each condition. If you are unsure which deficiency exists, there are foliar fertilizers that contain chelates of all three nutrients.

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Microgreens are tiny leafed vegetables that are grown from seed and require very little…
Kahili Ginger Plant Care

Hedychium gardnerianum (Kahili Ginger) - Monthly Plant Care Calendar

You can have these monthly Plant Care Reminders sent directly to you each month!

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