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General Information

Plant Care Instructions By Julie Bawden-Davis

Common edible pea, which is originally from southern Europe. Plant comes in vining and bush forms. Grows best in the cool, humid conditions of late fall through early spring.

Is Indoor Plant?

No

These month by month plant care tasks are for plants in the following zones :
Sunset Zones : 22, 23, 24
USDA Zones : 10a, 10b
Web Link - For more information

Plant Care Instruction

  • Scroll down or click on any month for plant care instructions
    • January
    • February
    • March
    • April
    • September
    • October
    • November
    • December
    January
    1. Buy

    Buy plants in the nursery when available.
    2. Plant

    Plant in a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 2 feet between rows for bush types and 4 feet between rows for tall, vining varieties.
    3. Sow Seeds

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.
    4. Fertilize

    If not done the prior month, fertilize when the plant begins to flower with a balanced fertilizer designed for vegetable crops. Avoid overfeeding, as excessive nitrogen leads to foliage but no flowers.
    5. Water

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.
    6. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.
    7. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.
    8. Transplant

    Transplant plants seeded in containers to a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 2 feet between rows for bush types and 4 feet between rows for tall, vining varieties.
    9. Harvest

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting shelling peas when they have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest edible-pod peas before they begin swelling when they reach 2 to 3 inches long. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.
    10. Special requirements

    Vining types of peas require trellising.
    February
    1. Buy

    Buy plants in the nursery when available.
    2. Plant

    Plant in a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 2 feet between rows for bush types and 4 feet between rows for tall, vining varieties.
    3. Sow Seeds

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.
    4. Fertilize

    If not done the prior month, fertilize when the plant begins to flower with a balanced fertilizer designed for vegetable crops. Avoid overfeeding, as excessive nitrogen leads to foliage but no flowers.
    5. Water

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.
    6. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.
    7. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.
    8. Transplant

    Transplant plants seeded in containers to a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 2 feet between rows for bush types and 4 feet between rows for tall, vining varieties.
    9. Harvest

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting shelling peas when they have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest edible-pod peas before they begin swelling when they reach 2 to 3 inches long. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.
    10. Special requirements

    Vining types of peas require trellising.
    March
    1. Water

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.
    2. Mulch

    Mulch with a 1-inch layer of shredded bark to keep soil cool and moist.
    3. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.
    4. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.
    5. Transplant

    Transplant plants seeded in containers to a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 2 feet between rows for bush types and 4 feet between rows for tall, vining varieties.
    6. Harvest

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting shelling peas when they have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest edible-pod peas before they begin swelling when they reach 2 to 3 inches long. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.
    7. Special requirements

    Vining types of peas require trellising.
    April
    1. Water

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.
    2. Mulch

    Mulch with a 1-inch layer of shredded bark to keep soil cool and moist.
    3. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.
    4. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.
    5. Harvest

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting shelling peas when they have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest edible-pod peas before they begin swelling when they reach 2 to 3 inches long. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.
    6. Special requirements

    Vining types of peas require trellising.
    September
    1. Sow Seeds

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.
    October
    1. Sow Seeds

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.
    November
    1. Buy

    Buy plants in the nursery when available.
    2. Plant

    Plant in a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 2 feet between rows for bush types and 4 feet between rows for tall, vining varieties.
    3. Sow Seeds

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.
    4. Water

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.
    5. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.
    6. Special requirements

    Vining types of peas require trellising.
    December
    1. Buy

    Buy plants in the nursery when available.
    2. Plant

    Plant in a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 2 feet between rows for bush types and 4 feet between rows for tall, vining varieties.
    3. Sow Seeds

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.
    4. Fertilize

    When the plant begins to flower, fertilize with a balanced fertilizer designed for vegetable crops.
    5. Water

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.
    6. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.
    7. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.
    8. Transplant

    Transplant plants seeded in containers to a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 2 feet between rows for bush types and 4 feet between rows for tall, vining varieties.
    9. Harvest

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting shelling peas when they have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest edible-pod peas before they begin swelling when they reach 2 to 3 inches long. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.
    10. Special requirements

    Vining types of peas require trellising.
  • Buy

    When's the best time to buy this plant? When can you buy these from seed (if you can)? When is it usually available? What are things to look for when you're buying it? Or anything other tidbit of information you can share!

    January

    Buy plants in the nursery when available.

    February

    Buy plants in the nursery when available.

    November

    Buy plants in the nursery when available.

    December

    Buy plants in the nursery when available.

    Plant

    When's a good time to plant this plant or bulb? Any special planting instructions?

    January

    Plant in a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 2 feet between rows for bush types and 4 feet between rows for tall, vining varieties.

    February

    Plant in a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 2 feet between rows for bush types and 4 feet between rows for tall, vining varieties.

    November

    Plant in a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 2 feet between rows for bush types and 4 feet between rows for tall, vining varieties.

    December

    Plant in a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 2 feet between rows for bush types and 4 feet between rows for tall, vining varieties.

    Sow Seeds

    When can you plant these seeds? When's the best time? Can you start them indoors and move them out? Do they have any special requirements?

    January

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.

    February

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.

    September

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.

    October

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.

    November

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.

    December

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.

    Fertilize

    When should you fertilize this plant? Which kind of fertilizer do you recommend? Should you use different fertilizers at different times of year?

    January

    If not done the prior month, fertilize when the plant begins to flower with a balanced fertilizer designed for vegetable crops. Avoid overfeeding, as excessive nitrogen leads to foliage but no flowers.

    February

    If not done the prior month, fertilize when the plant begins to flower with a balanced fertilizer designed for vegetable crops. Avoid overfeeding, as excessive nitrogen leads to foliage but no flowers.

    December

    When the plant begins to flower, fertilize with a balanced fertilizer designed for vegetable crops.

    Water

    Is there a time to reduce or increase watering? Any special requirements? Things to avoid during certain times of the year?

    January

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.

    February

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.

    March

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.

    April

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.

    November

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.

    December

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.

    Mulch

    Does this plant need to be mulched? Are there specific types of Mulch which are better for this plant? How much?

    March

    Mulch with a 1-inch layer of shredded bark to keep soil cool and moist.

    April

    Mulch with a 1-inch layer of shredded bark to keep soil cool and moist.

    Pest/Disease Inspection

    What are the common problems this plant will face and when should you look for them to appear?

    January

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.

    February

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.

    March

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.

    April

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.

    November

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.

    December

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.

    Treat for Pest/Disease

    How do you treat the common problems for this plant? What products or concoctions or natural means do you use? Any special requirements?

    January

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.

    February

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.

    March

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.

    April

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.

    December

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.

    Transplant

    When's the best time to dig up and transplant this from one spot to another? (This is different than planting). Any special requirements?

    January

    Transplant plants seeded in containers to a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 2 feet between rows for bush types and 4 feet between rows for tall, vining varieties.

    February

    Transplant plants seeded in containers to a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 2 feet between rows for bush types and 4 feet between rows for tall, vining varieties.

    March

    Transplant plants seeded in containers to a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 2 feet between rows for bush types and 4 feet between rows for tall, vining varieties.

    December

    Transplant plants seeded in containers to a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 2 feet between rows for bush types and 4 feet between rows for tall, vining varieties.

    Harvest

    When's a good time to harvest this plant? What's the best way to harvest? Are there special requirements or features?

    January

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting shelling peas when they have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest edible-pod peas before they begin swelling when they reach 2 to 3 inches long. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.

    February

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting shelling peas when they have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest edible-pod peas before they begin swelling when they reach 2 to 3 inches long. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.

    March

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting shelling peas when they have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest edible-pod peas before they begin swelling when they reach 2 to 3 inches long. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.

    April

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting shelling peas when they have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest edible-pod peas before they begin swelling when they reach 2 to 3 inches long. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.

    December

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting shelling peas when they have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest edible-pod peas before they begin swelling when they reach 2 to 3 inches long. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.

    Special requirements

    Any other requirement for this plant? Is there anything that doesn't fit into the other care categories?

    January

    Vining types of peas require trellising.

    February

    Vining types of peas require trellising.

    March

    Vining types of peas require trellising.

    April

    Vining types of peas require trellising.

    November

    Vining types of peas require trellising.

    December

    Vining types of peas require trellising.

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