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Morning sun is especially important because it dries the leaves, which helps to prevent disease. Roses can be grown in the ground or in pots--but they are NOT houseplants. (Don’t use CLAY POTS or put saucers under the containers). Most hybrid teas do well in 15 gallon pots while mini roses do well in 5-7 gallon pots.

teasing_georgia.jpg

Roses appreciate lots of water. Water generously at least 1” a week but prefer 2” a week during the growing season and HOT weather. Never let roses “dry out”, but don’t let them “sit” in water either. Be sure they DRAIN. Wash rose foliage often to clean off leaves and prevent or control disease. Keeping your roses and the surrounding area clean will help keep the disease at a minimum. Washing off your foliage will keep mildew under control, but make sure that the roses have time to dry before the sun goes down.

Deadhead or prune with SHARP, clean bypass pruners. Anvil pruners should not be used for roses as they crush the stem being cut. 

Roses appreciate lots of water. Water generously at least 1” a week but prefer 2” a week during the growing season and HOT weather. Never let roses “dry out”, but don’t let them “sit” in water either. Be sure they DRAIN. Wash rose foliage often to clean off leaves and prevent or control disease. Keeping your roses and the surrounding area clean will help keep the disease at a minimum. Washing off your foliage will keep mildew under control, but make sure that the roses have time to dry before the sun goes down.

Deadhead or prune with SHARP, clean bypass pruners. Anvil pruners should not be used for roses as they crush the stem being cut.

Roses like to eat as well as drink. A monthly application of a dry or liquid fertilizer makes for healthy growth and blooms. ALWAYS water Before you fertilize and never use SYSTEMIC Rose Food. Organics such as blood meal, fish emulsion, bone meal, alfalfa meal or organic blended fertilizers can help nourish your plants. BE SURE AND WATER BEFORE & AFTER YOU FEED.

Water blast off most insects and disease spores daily. Pull off leaves with rust. ALWAYS clean
up around the bottom of your roses and clean out the center of your plants for air circulation. Be
sure and pull weeds around your roses and deadhead to keep plants flowering.

MONTHLY ROSE CARE (ORGANIC)

January-Prune Roses Plant bare root roses or transplant roses after pruning. Pull off all leaves and clean up all debris from around roses. Put down 2 Tbs. per plant of John & Bob’s Soil Optimizer. Put down 2 C Dr Earth rose Fertilizer (or any organic fertilizer) per plant and scratch in lightly. Put down 2 C Biosol

February-Prune roses if not done in January-plant bare root roses, transplant roses after pruning. (same as Jan.) Check new growth and sidebud if necessary. (Continue sidebudding throughout the year as desired.) (Prune excess growth going to inside of bush.) Wash off aphids (water blast) at first sign (best to do early morning). Start regular watering of plants if not enough rain to sustain.

March-Mulch when soil warms up Give roses humus or humic acid (found in compost or some organic products-read label). Fertilize with organic fertilizer (Dr Earth), Biosol, and if not done in Jan., John & Bob’s Soil Optimizer. Make alfalfa tea (or some other teas or liquid fertilizer) when have 4-6 inches of new growth. Walk garden daily to check for pests and/or fungal disease.

April-Put down 2 C Dr Earth Fertilizer 6-8 weeks after initial feeding. Deadhead roses after initial bloom and continue throughout year.

May-Feed Fish Emulsion (Dilute 1 Tbs per gallon H2O-feed 1 gallon to large roses and 1/2 to small roses).

June-Put down 2 C Dr Earth Rose Fertilizer.

July-Apply another liquid fertilizer-(Fish Emulsion, Dr Earth 3-3-3, etc.)

August-Last of month, “summer prune” to promote good fall bloom. Prune 1/3 of bush. Put down 2 Tbs. John & Bob’s Soil Optimizer, 2 C Dr Earth Rose Fertilizer & Biosol, scratch in lightly.

September-Give roses liquid food-(Alfalfa tea, compost tea, soil soup, etc).

October-Feed roses 2 C Dr Earth (last time in year).

November/December-Stop deadheading, instead pull off old petals, leaving hips. Slow down on watering, but do not let roses dry out.

Peace & Love RoseAlways make sure roses are well hydrated before spraying or feeding. Water 8-24 hrs before applying. Mulch as soon as weather warms up to help conserve moisture and keep down weeds. Use mulch that will help build your soil. Also foliar applications of seaweed, soil soup or compost tea help keep disease and pests under control and improve foliage. Apply worm castings anytime. (I use it twice a year-after pruning and in Aug/Sept.) Make sure a regular watering cycle is implemented once new growth starts in spring. Water around rain. Do not let new growth dry out or it will burn. In heat of summer, increase watering to keep roses hydrated.

Deadhead flowers throughout spring and summer to promote new blooms. Make proper cuts using sharp bypass pruners.

Read and Follow directions on packages of fertilizers and other products. Organic fertilizers do not burn so can be applied when you like. Do not use systemic fertilizers (pesticide and fungicide all in one).

Although this Rose Care Calendar is specific to Southern California, the procedures and products may apply by adjusting the months to your area starting when you prune.

Dormant Spray - I no longer dormant spray. The reason for dormant spraying is to kill over wintering pests or disease. I no longer have a problem with disease that would warrant spraying so I don’t feel a need to use dormant spray. When I did use it, I did not notice any appreciable results. In instances where you have a pest or disease problem you can use a lime-sulfur spray or a horticultural oil to control these problems after pruning.

Make sure roses are well hydrated before spraying or feeding. Water 8-24 hours before applying. Mulch as soon as weather worms up to help conserve moisture, keep weeds down and help add nutrients and organic matter to the soil. Using mulch will help build your soil. Also foliar applications of seaweed, soil soup or compost tea help keep disease and pests under control and improve foliage. Apply worm castings anytime. I like to use it at least twice a year, after pruning and in Aug/Sept. Make sure a regular watering cycle is implemented once new growth starts in spring. Water around rain. Do not let new growth dry out or it will burn. In heat of summer, increase watering to keep roses hydrated.

Deadhead flowers throughout spring and summer to promote new blooms. Make proper cuts using sharp bypass pruners. The products that I mention here are readily available in Southern California, but may not be in your area. Most of these products are available for mail order from their websites (listed below). There are probably several organic products in your area, that may do the same or even have similar ingredients for your use, and may give the same results. Be sure and check the ingredients on the package. Read and follow directions on packages of fertilizers and other products. Organic fertilizers do not burn so can be applied when you like. Do not use systemic fertilizers (pesticide and fungicide all in one).

When feeding or spraying, it is best to observe safety procedures and not breath in even organic products. A simple dust mask will help keep it out of your lungs.

Check out these websites for information on the products mentioned in my calendar and for other good gardening ideas. Biosol.....www.sandiegoorganicsupply.com

John & Bob’s Soil Optimizer.....www.johnandbobs.com

Dr Earth Rose Fertilizer.....www.drearth.net

 

FERTILIZERS

 

The following is a list of organic fertilizers and their main nutrient. Many of these also carry other trace elements and minerals that your plants need so their addition is of even more value.

(N=Nitrogen, P=Phosphorus, K=Potassium)

 Alfalfa meal - N  Blood meal - N  Bone meal - P
 Cottonseed meal - N  Fish meal - N  Kelp meal - K with some N
 Rock Phosphate - P  Soybean meal - N  Sul-Po-Mag - K

 

Other organic products you can use to enhance your soil are:

  • Compost

  • Worm Castings - organic matter plus 11 trace minerals

  • Fish Emulsion - N

  • Manures - organic matter (should be well composted)

  • Greensand - Potash and many trace elements-best used if added to compost

These organic fertilizers can be fed alone or mixed together in a blend. There are companies out there producing mixed and blended products. Dr Earth & Whitney Farms are two of the best known. Other companies are making individual organic fertilizers that can be incorporated into a balanced program. If using individual components, you would not want to use all N products, but a mix to make a balance mixture.

 

An example might be:

  • 2 parts blood or 3 parts alfalfa meal

  • 3 parts bone meal

  • 1 part kelp meal

Feed one cup and work into top inch of soil. I like to use alfalfa meal at the beginning of the growing season and later use blood meal when buds are forming as it helps bring out the brilliant colors of the blooms. There are two products I do not use in excess - Alfalfa contains triaconatol that is a growth stimulant, but if used in excess can have a reverse effect. Blood meal, for an organic, has high N content so it should not be over used and dogs usually love it.

 

Alfalfa Tea (fertilizer)

  • 6 1 lb. coffee cans of Alfalfa meal

  • 2 C. Epsom Salts (if you use John & Bob’s you can omit this).

  • 2 C. Iron Liquid or granules (if you use John & Bob’s you can omit this).

  • 2 C. Liquid Fish Emulsion

Directions: Place the Alfalfa pellets/meal in 32 gallon trash can. Add enough water to fill container. Let it set for 24-48 (you can leave longer, just be sure to stir often). Before using: Add the other ingredients. (If you wish to add a water soluble fertilizer, add just before application.) Mix well. Feed each large rose bush one-gallon. Give each mini - 1/2 gallon of diluted to 1/2 strength.

 

Baking Soda Formula for Mildew:

   1 Gallon H20 Recipe  1 Quart H20 Recipe
Baking Soda  1 1/2 TBS  1 1/8 TSP
White Vinegar  1 TBS  3/4 TSP
Vegetable Oil  2 TBS (2 1/2 TBS Corn Oil)  1 1/2 TSP
Liquid Soap  1 1/2 TBS  1/2 TSP

 

Stir all ingredients (Do Not Shake)-(Concentrated soap or safer soap-do not use detergent) **Do not spray when the weather will get hot (80 degrees or more). Spray when it cools-(early morning or evening).

 

Compost tea or Worm Castings teas can be used for foliar applications that will feed and help against fungal diseases. For more information on organic care go to: www.organicrosecare.org 

 

 

PRUNING TIPS:

 

Tools

  1. rosecareimages2.jpgPruner-bypass 

  2. Pruning Saw

  3. Sharpening stone

  4. Lopers (for large canes)

  5. Small rake for cleanup

 

Making the Cut (see Illustration):

  1. The classical correct cut.

  2. Cut too far above the eye.

  3. Cut too steep an angle above the eye.

  4. Wrong direction of angle cut.

  5. Cut was badly executed, but more seriously a new pair of pruning shears is required.

 rosecareimages1.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A number of general points of advice

First--Remove weak or twiggy growth

Second--Remove any diseased or crossing canes

Third--Prune to healthy tissue. If dieback, must cut to clean canes. If borer damage, must cut to clean canes.

Fourth--Prune to open the center of the bush

Fifth--Cut out old canes. Make sure and cut (best to use pruning saw) them flush with the bud union with clean and smooth cuts. Loosen and remove any dead or flaky bark on bud union to promote basal growth.

Last--Remove any remaining foliage from the canes and clean up and trash any leaves and/or debris around roses.

 

Join your local Rose Society for more helpful tips and enjoy meeting other rose lovers who enjoy
the same hobby of growing roses. Contact us on our profile on the Mulch or email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for further information and we are always eager to assist you with ay rose questions you may need answered.


www.ars.org American Rose Society
www.sdrosesociety.org San Diego Rose Society
www.eastcountyrosesociety.com East County Rose Society
www.organicrosecare.org Good Earth Rose Committee 


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